A TRIP DOWN A LONELY IRISH LANE REVEALS MEDIEVAL MASTERPIECE

A cool easterly breeze blows in our faces as we take time to soak up the ambience of the scene before us.

A quiet country lane cuts the lush green fields of the Irish landscape and in the mid distance the imposing ruins of an ancient medieval Franciscan friary stand proudly on a barely noticeable knoll.

There is a noticeable energy despite us being a mile away.  Intrigued we return to the car and negotiate the blackberry bush lined lane toward Ross Errilly’s beautifully preserved structure.

A feeling of calm surrounds us as we move from the car park toward the friary.  We comment to each other on our feelings and agree that something special awaits us inside the entrance.

The friary is thought to have been constructed in the mid 1400’s and, despite the English Reformation and Cromwell’s Irish campaign, it was occupied for almost 400 years.  Some would say the recent burials inside the friary’s grounds means that it continues to be occupied.

Inside the friary one is caused to negotiate narrow passageways and tiny crawl spaces – a true adventure.  Beautiful window arches and intact pillars allow the mind to re-create how this stunning structure would have looked.

The 600 year-old building has withstood climate extremes and no doubt it will continue to endure the next 600 years of wind, rain and temperature.  They built them to last back in the 1400’s.

Each area of the friary was built with a purpose in mind – accommodation, food preparation and storage and religious duties were all taken into account.  Moving from one section to another the spirits of previous inhabitants seem to welcome you and guide you through their domain.

Architectural angles, natural light, moss covered rock and beautiful design offer up their beauty to our lenses and we delight in soaking up the experience of Ross Errilly.

Alas, the cool wind brings in a light shower of rain.  It’s time to go.  We negotiate our way out into the courtyard just as a bus load of tourists arrives.  Perfect timing.

To “feel” Ross Errilly make sure you visit when the crowds have left.  Let your senses be taken on a journey and don’t be in a hurry to leave.

This beautiful friary is located about a mile north of Headford, County Galway in Ireland.  Entry to the national monument is free .

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One Response to “A TRIP DOWN A LONELY IRISH LANE REVEALS MEDIEVAL MASTERPIECE”

  1. eduardo says:

    baggy@embarrassingly.swallow” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    good info!…

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